Articles Tagged with “business lawsuits”

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Jury selection for an intellectual property suit between two technology heavy-hitters began on April 16. The case, which is being tried before a federal court in California, involves Oracle Corp. and Google, with Oracle accusing Google of copyright and patent infringement. It is seeking $1 billion in damages as well as an injunction to prevent Google from further distributing the popular Android mobile operating system.

The heart of the matter concerns the development of the Android system. Oracle is alleging that Google improperly used Java in developing Android. Java is an Oracle-owned product that allows for developers to easily write programs for use on any computer. It specifically says that Google infringed on two patents, as well as infringed on the copyright Oracle holds on a technology known as application programming interfaces (APIs).
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One of the most important things for a company is the protection of its intellectual property. This property may well define the company in the eyes of the public, making it all the more vital to see that others are not infringing upon it. In that vein, California readers may be interested to hear that the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences recently filed a copyright infringement suit against an events rental company.

According to a news report, the events company had been allowing customers to rent oversized Oscar statuettes. It was also reportedly selling the statuettes as well. As the Academy has a copyright on the form of the Oscar statuette, it has a right to prevent others from using it in their promotional items and from selling it.
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When faced with a lawsuit from a large organization, a small business may not necessarily know how to fight back, much less have the resources to do so. That appears to be the case with a recent wave of lawsuits filed against small businesses in California. These lawsuits are targeted at businesses that fail to make the appropriate payment for playing a pay-per-view event. However, the amount sued for to cover the alleged copyright infringement may not always be suitable, as one business lawsuit made clear.

In that incident, a small business owner of a bar in Aptos, California found himself facing a lawsuit for $160,000 in damages for a pay-per-view event his bar displayed. However, in this case, the event was turned on by a patron and not by the bar itself. Normally, the cost of displaying the event would have been $800.
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